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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Donald Trump’s election has sparked dramatic growth in recruitment for left-wing political organizations, including the Workers World Party, which held its national conference in Newark, New Jersey.

The Democratic Party and U.S. corporate media have spent more than a year trying to blame the Russians for the myriad crises that afflict the United States. Anti-Russian hysteria has reached McCarthy-Era levels. Left-wing journalists have been targeted for blacklisting, and accused of spreading “fake news.” Julianne TWEET-EN reports on the intersection of technology and socio- economic issues. She recently wrote an article for In These Times magazine, titled, “How the Fake News Scare is Marginalizing the Left.”

The election of Donald Trump was considered bad news by most folks on the Left. But, radical political organizations have experienced dramatic increases in recruitment since Trump moved into the White House. That’s certainly true for the Workers World Party, which held its national conference in Newark, New Jersey. The conference coincided with the 50 th anniversary of the Newark rebellion of 1967. The Workers World Party was welcomed to Newark by Larry Hamm, chairman of the People’s Organization for Progress, which has been fighting for social justice for more than three decades.

Workers World Party First Secretary Larry Holmes noted that his party has experienced dramatic growth since the election of Donald Trump.

 

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The people of Haiti remember a time when they had a real army, that fought against slavery and foreign oppression; U.S. prosecutors try to put hundreds of demonstrators in prison for breaking the same window; and, Mumia Abu Jamal writes a book that asks the question, “Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?”

But first, Democrats, corporate media and U.S. spy agencies have combined to make Russia the boogeyman for every crisis and failure of the United States. We spoke with Daniel Kovalik, a professor of human rights at the University of Pittsburgh, and author of the book, “The Plot to Scapegoat Russia.” We asked Kovalik, what’s the motive for scapegoating Russia, and who’se behind it?

Police in Haiti violently crushed protests against plans to reactivate the Haitian Army, which was abolished as a force of repression and corruption. However, over the weekend, many Haitians remembered when their country had a real army – one that fought for human liberation. Daoud Andre is a Brooklyn-based radio host and Haitian community activist.

In Washington, hundreds of demonstrators and journalists face long terms in prison for protests on the day in January when Donald Trump was sworn in as president. Chip Gibbons is policy counsel for the group, Defending Rights and Dissent. Gibbons says federal prosecutors seem intent on outlawing protest in the United States.

Also in the nation’s capital, activist Netfa Freeman represented the Black Alliance for Peace at a recent national conference of the Black Is Back Coalition, at Howard University.

Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, has a new book out. Supporters from around the country held parties to help Mumia launch his book, titled, “Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?”

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: a Black radical candidate explains how you can run a winning political campaign, even if you lose the election; and first, they stole the people’s right to vote, in Detroit, then they stole the water and everything else.

two researchers at the Institute for Policy Studies have released a new examination on wealth concentration and and inequality in the United States. Chuck Collins and Josh Hoxie’s report is titled, “Billionaire Bonanza 2017. We spoke to Collins at his office in Washington. He says three billionaires -- Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet – own more wealth than the entire bottom half of the U.S. population: 160 million people.

The Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations marched on the White House and held its national conference at Howard University, in Washington. The theme of the conference was, “The Ballot AND the Bullet: Elections, War and Peace in the Era of Donald Trump.” Among those who spoke at the conference was Eritha Akile Cainion, a 20 year old member of the African People’s Socialist Party who ran for city council in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Also speaking at the Black Is Back Coalition conference, was Dr. Marsha Coleman Adebayo, the veteran activist with the No Fear Coalition and an editor of Black Agenda Report. Adebayo asked for solidarity and assistance from the Coalition.

The citizens of the Black metropolis of Detroit were stripped of their right to manage their local affairs by a bankruptcy process imposed on the city in 2013. Since then, hundreds of thousands of Detroit households have faced cut-offs of water. Dr. Josiah Rector, a professor of history and Northland College, spoke recently at Detroit’s Museum of African American History. Dr. Rector said the same bakers and financiers that bankrupted Detroit have stolen the people’s right to water.

Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, has posted a new essay on Prison Radio. He calls it “Sex Wars.”

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The United States claims that it is in Syria to fight al Qaida, but the al Qaida affiliate in that country has disappeared from the U.S. terrorist list; Black students at Temple University explore the Black Panther Party’s approach to social revolution; and, Mumia Abu Jamal says goodbye to a native American activist.

The people of Puerto Rico, a U.S. colony in the Caribbean, are confronting much the same economic powers that bankrupted Detroit, four years ago, and stripped the citizens of that Black metropolis of control over their local affairs. We spoke with Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Detroit based Pan African News web site. Azikiwe says finance capital – the bankers – are behind the misery in both Detroit and Puerto Rico, where hurricanes have wrecked the economy and plunged the island further in debt.

The United States claims it is fighting a war on terror in the world, and bombing terrorists daily, in Syria. But, the al Qaida affiliate in Syria, which used to be called the Al Nusra Front, but changed its name, has disappeared from U.S. lists of terrorist organizations. The Syrian government and Russia charge Washington with forming an alliance with al Qaida in Syria. We spoke with Dr. Gerald Horne, the prolific author and professor of history at the University of Houston.

Students and community members gathered late last month at Philadelphia’s Temple University to discuss the life and times of Huey P. Newton, the co- founder of the Black Panther Party. One of the speakers at the all-day conference was Kashara White, of the Philadelphia Saturday Free School. Ms. White recalled the battle over the future of Temple’s African American Studies program, two years ago, that resulted in the firing of activist professor Anthony Monteiro, and the promotion to department head of Molefi Asante, who calls himself an Africologist. Kashara White told the conference that young activists can learn from the Black Panther Party’s experience, in which Party members were killed by cultural nationalists on a college campus in Los Angeles.

In New York City, the activist organization Black Youth Project 100 is engaged in a campaign against the exclusionary practices of the state, including banning people from public housing if a family member is arrested. Rahel Mekdim Peka is an organizer with Black Youth Project 100. She’s also working on the “Swipe It Forward” campaign, which urges subway users with unlimited mass transit cards to help others avoid being arrested for non-payment of fares.

Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, remembers Dennis Banks, the American Indian Movement leader who died, last week.

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Black and Brown students at Philadelphia’s Temple University hold an all-day conference on Black Panther Party co-founder Huey P. Newton and the Struggle for World Peace and Self-Determination; and, a New York City DJ reports on the ten days she spent among the people of Palestine, under Israeli military occupation.

Dr. Johnny Wlliams, a professor of sociology at Trinity College, in Hartford, Connecticut, has been put on a leave of absence, in the wake of organized white protests against a statement he posted on social media, this summer. Dr. Williams was angry over police killings of Black people. He had recently read a post by someone that called himself “Son of Baldwin,” who titled his piece, “Let Them Ef-fing Die.”

In Philadelphia, this past weekend, students from Temple University’s Black and Brown Coalition held an all-day conference on Black Panther Party co-founder Huey P. Newton and the Struggle for World Peace and Self-Determination. Some of the organizers, like Davya Nair, are also members of the Philadelphia Saturday Free School. Nair spoke on the subject of Education for Liberation.

Elias Gonzalez also spoke at the panel on Education for Liberation. He learned something early on when he joined the Philadelphia Free School, two years ago.

Christie Love is a New York City area DJ and political activist, who recently returned from a ten-day trip to Israeli-Occupied Palestine. DJ Christie Lover reported back to “Existence for Resistance,” one of the organizations that made her trip in solidarity with Palestinians possible. Christie Lover told Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser what she learned about the day-to- day lives of Palestinians.

And that’s it for this edition of Black Agenda Radio.

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 Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Ten years after a murder conviction was thrown out because of racist prosecution practices, the Philadelphia District attorney is pressing for the death penalty against Sugar Bear Lark. And, activists across the country turn out for National Stop Police Brutality Day.
 
People around the world are marking the 100 th anniversary of the Great October Russian Revolution. Next year will mark the 15oth anniversary of the birth of the great scholar and activist W.E.B. Dubois. In Philadelphia, Duboisian scholar Dr. Anthony Monteiro is celebrating both anniversaries.
 
The Philadelphia District Attorney’s office wants to kill Robert Lark, a 63 year old Black man who has been imprisoned almost 40 years in the death of a shopkeeper for. Lark is better known as “Sugar Bear,” a politically active prisoner whose death sentence was overturned ten years ago because Blacks were systematically kept off the jury. Sugar Bear is a prison contemporary of Mumia Abu Jamal, a fellow Black Philadelphian and the nation’s best known political prisoner. Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser spoke with Dr. Johanna Fernandez, a professor of history and African American studies at Baruch College and an activist with the Campaign to Bring Mumia Home. Fernandez was asked, is Sugar Bear Lark a political prisoner?
 
In many cities across the United States, activists took to the streets this past weekend for National Stop Police Brutality Day. Larry Hamm, chairman of Newark, New Jersey’s People’s Organization for Progress, explains.
 
Black women are the fastest growing population in U.S. prisons. At the Pennsylvania prison for women, in Muncy, inmate Terry Harper presented this essay for Prison Radio.
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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The city council in Philadelphia rejects the idea of Black Community Control of the Police, so activists take the concept directly to the people; and, the Black and indigenous peoples of Colombia, South America,
demand that the government respect their rights to collective ownership of the land.

The Black Is Back Coalition is preparing for its annual March on the White House and national conference, on November 4 th and 5 th . The theme of the conference is “The Ballot AND the Bullet: Elections, War and Peace in the Era of Donald Trump.” We spoke with Black Is Back chairman Omali Yeshitela.

Diop Olugbala is a Black is Back activist in Philadelphia, where he was one of the organizers of a local conference on Black community control of the police.

In Colombia, South America, the government has signed a peace deal with FARC guerillas to end a 60 year war. Part of that agreement called on the government to recognize Black and indigenous Colombians’ collective right to land, and to develop their own economies. However, Charo Mina Rojas, of the Afro-Colombian organization Black Community Process, says the government has resisted actual implementation of the agreement.

Charles Diggs is a long-time inmate at the Graterford State prison, in Pennsylvania. He’s written an essay for Prison Radio, titled, Fear of Love. 

And that’s it for this edition of Black Agenda Radio.

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: A Philadelphia Judge has supporters of Mumia Abu Jamal worried; Canadians of Caribbean descent organize for political solidarity; and, Is the U.S. trying to depopulate its island colony of Puerto Rico?

A question of religion and Black radicalism. Dr. Vincent Lloyd is a professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University. Dr. Lloyd wrote a recent article for Black Agenda Report, in which he maintained that Black American religion is rooted in radicalism, exemplified by leaders such as Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King. Dr. Lloyd said that what he calls “secularism” means being caught up in “the world as it is,” and not as it should be.

Donald Trump is almost certainly the most disliked man in Puerto Rico. Trump’s insulting remarks in the wake of Hurricane Irma cut deep into Puerto Rican pride. The U.S. colony has lost 10 percent of its population in the last decade due to U.S. economic policies. Some folks believe that the real goal of U.S. policy is to depopulate the island. We spoke with Kevin Cashman, of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington.

The Caribbean region has been battered by both global warming and neocolonial political relationships. Runako Gregg is a co-founder of the Canada-based Caribbean Solidarity Network. He spoke to us from Toronto.

It’s been 100 years since the Russian Revolution changed the history of the world. Dr. Gerald Horne, professor of history and African Amerian Studies at Houston University, was part of a celebration of the past century of Struggle for Scientific Socialism. Dr. Horne discussed the seminal work of historian Philip S. Foner, author of the book, The Bolshevik Revolution and Its Impact on American Radicals, Liberals, and Labor.

Supporters of Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, are worried about the recent conduct of Judge Leon Tucker. The Pennsylvania judge had earlier demanded that the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office provide all of its files on Abu Jamal’s case, so he could determine if the DA had shown a bias towards his political allies in the Fraternal Order of Police. However, last month Judge Tucker appeared to ease up on his pressures on the DA’s office. Sophia Williams, of the Campaign to Bring Mumia Home, is worried.

And that’s it for this edition of Black Agenda Radio.

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: an activist with the Black Alliance for Peace urges anti-war and environmental groups to make their movements look more like the people of planet Earth; and, the chairman of the Jericho Movement talks about the plight of America’s aging political prisoners – in particular, the attack on former Black Panther Herman Bell.

The media is full of discussion, nowadays, about racist behavior, but not much attention is paid to the actual material conditions of Black life in the United States. Black Agenda Report contributor Danny Haiphong recently wrote an article on the precarious financial state of Black families. It’s titled, “Black America: The Wealth-less Community.”

Peace and environmental activists came together for an historic conference in Washington DC, to explore ways to strengthen collaboration between the two movements. One of those on hand was Rev. Lukata Mjumbe, a Black minister in Irvington, New Jersey, and veteran human rights and environmental justice activist. Rev. Mjumbe is on the coordinating committee of the Black Alliance for Peace.

The Jericho Movement does its best to represent the interests and welfare of political prisoners in the United States. The Jericho Movement’s list is shrinking, not because the U.S. isn’t creating new political prisoners, but because activists incarcerated in the Sixties and Seventies are dying off. The surviving imprisoned radicals still catch hell from prison guards. Sixty-nine year old former Black Panther Herman Bell was seriously injured when he was attacked by New York State prison guards, last month. Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser spoke with the chairman of the National Jericho Movement, Jihad Abdulmumit.

The news on corporate media is largely fake or non-existent, but there are a few broadcast outlets that serve the people’s information needs. One of them is WMXP radio, in Greenville, South Carolina, which is run by the folks at Greenville’s Malcolm X Center for Self-Determination. Veteran people’s lawyer and activist Efia Nwangaza is the Center’s executive director.

And that’s it for this edition of Black Agenda Radio.

 

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Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Is Donald Trump a White Supremacist? Margaret Kimberley says, Yes, AND he’s head of a white supremacist country; Ajamu Baraka calls out the Congressional Black Caucus for supporting Donald Trump’s gargantuan War Budget; and, trial is set for November for activsts that tore down a Confederate statue in Durham, North Carolina.

Omali Yeshitela, chairman of the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations, has been in St. Louis, where a cop who verbally vowed to kill a young Black man, and then proceeded to shot him to death, was found not guilty by a judge. Yeshitela is worried that a disturbing “new norm” is setting into the cycle of police atrocities and Black response.

Ajamu Baraka, the former Green Party vice presidential nominee and veteran human rights activist, is the lead organizer of the Black Alliance for Peace. Baraka is also an editor and columnist for Black Agenda Report, where he recently wrote an article titled, “Why Anti-Trumpism Doesn’t Include Anti-War.” The Democratic Party-oriented so-called “Resistance” is against everything about Donald Trump EXCEPT his continuation of U.S. war policies around the world.

Is Donald Trump a white supremacist? Black Agenda Report senior columnist Margaret Kimberley says, Yes, of course, and the very presence of Donald Trump in the White House is proof of the endemic nature of White Supremacy in the United States. Kimberley wrote an article for BAR title, “Trump AND America are White Supremacist.” She says too many folks try to treat Trump as some kind of special case.

Takiyah Thompson, a 22-year- old student and member of the Workers World Party, is among the activists facing felony charges in Durham, North Carolina, for tearing down a statue of a Confederate soldiers, this summer. The trial is scheduled for November. We asked Ms. Thompson how she and her co- defendants have been holding up.

Mass Black Incarceration has been the law of the land for more than forty years. Two generations of young people have grown old behind the bars. Charles Diggs is an incarcerated correspondent for Prison Radio, in Pennylvania’s Graterford State Prison. Diggs says prisons have become warehouses for senior citizens.

And that’s it for this edition of Black Agenda Radio.

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