Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: More Black activists than ever are expected to travel to Richmond, Virginia for a national conference of UNAC, the United National Anti- War Coalition, in June. And, Cynthia McKinney, the Black former congresswoman and presidential candidate, explains how the Democrats became the loudest advocates of war.

Ajamu Baraka, the Green Party’s 2016 vice presidential candidate, is spearheading a campaign to revive the anti-war movement in Black America. Baraka is a co-founder of the U.S. Human Rights Network, and an editor and columnist for Black Agenda Report. He says the time is right to launch BAP -- Black Alliance for Peace. 

Ana Edwards - Co-founder, Virginia Defenders, one of the founding organizations of UNAC, the United National Anti-War Coalition, which is holding its national conference on her home turf, Richmond, Virginia, on June 16-18. UNAC organizers say this conference will have its biggest Black presence in the history of the Coalition.

Cynthia McKinney was one of the most consistent advocates of peace during her six terms as a Congresswoman from Georgia. She’s now teaching political science, overseas. McKinney says her former party, the Democrats, have become the most aggressive advocates of war.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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This is Black Agenda Radio, a weekly hour of African American political thought and action.  Coming up: People that are sent to prison are supposed to be given back their freedom when they’ve served their time. But that doesn’t seem to apply to Black political prisoners, many of whom are now elderly and sick 

 

the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations held a two-day school on electoral politics, earlier this month, in St. Petersburg, Florida. One of those on hand was Charles Barron, a former member of the Black Panther Party, who was elected to the New York City Council, and then to the state legislature. Assemblyman Barron says there’s no contradiction between his Black Panther politics and running for office.

Kamm Howard also spoke to the Coalition’s electoral politics school.

Howard is part of the leadership of NCOBRA, the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America, as well as a member of the Black Is Back Coalition’s executive board. Last year, Black is Back approved a 19-point National Black Political Agenda for Self-Determination. At the St. Petersburg school, Kamm Howard argued that skillful use of voter initiatives and referendums is a good way to push for reparations and Black community control the police and other issues on the agenda for Black self-determination. It also could be useful in challenging the legitimacy of the sell-outs of the Black Misleadership Class.

Prison abolitionists from across the country are gearing up for a Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March, in Washington, on August 19 th . But, for right now, Anne Lamb, co-chair of the Jericho Movement in New York City, is focused on freeing political prisoner Jalil Muntaqim. He’s the former Black Liberation Army member, once known as Anthony Bottoms, now serving his 46 th year behind bars. Ann Lamb spoke with Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser. She said the State wants Muntaqim to die in prison.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Haitians in the United States protest a speech by the former U.S. ambassador, a key player in the rigging of Haitian elections: Brazil turns back the clock on its Black and poor population; and, a Free School, in Philadelphia, celebrates five years of radical politics.

The United States bombed a Syrian airbase last week on the unproven allegation that the Syrian government was behind a chemical attack on civilians. Black Agenda Report editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley went on Sputnik Radio, to talk about the consequences of the U.S. attack.

Haitian community activists held a demonstration outside Brooklyn College, in New York, recently, to protest a speech by Kenneth Merten, the former U.S. ambassador to Haiti. Merten has been accused of being instrumental in rigging elections that put the U.S. backed candidate, Michel “Sweet Mickey” Martelly, in the presidency, in 2010. Daoud Andre was an organizer of the protest. We asked him why Haitian Americans would honor a man who committed crimes against their homeland?  

The United State welcomed the impeachment proceedings that deposed the left-wing Workers Party from the presidency of Brazil, last year. In Washington, we spoke with Alexander Main, of the Center for Economic and Policy Research. He says the right-wing government that threw out the Workers Party has the approval of less than ten percent of the public, but has cut social programs to the bone, as if it had a mandate from the people.

Senior associate for international policy, Center for Economic and Policy Research, DC. Wrote a piece for The Hill, Congress Must Take Attacks on Brazilians Democracy Seriously.” Brazil’s right-wing government has the approval of barely 10 percent of the population, but has cut social programs to the bone, as if it had a mandate from the people.

In Philadelphia, the Saturday Free School will celebrate its fifth anniversary on April 15, at its home in the historic Church of the advocate. The Free School began operations at Temple University, but soon found out that elite educational institutions were part of the problem, not the solution. Nandita Chaturvedi is a student, teacher and organizer at the Saturday Free school.

The nation’s best known political prisoner, Mumia Abu Jamal, finally forced prison officials in Pennsylvania to treat his life-threatening Hepatitis C infection. He produced this commentary for Prison Radio, titled, “The Illusion of Correctional Medicine.”

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left. I’m Nellie Bailey. Our thanks to the good people at the Progressive Radio Network.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The Greens charge the Democrats with stealing them blind in a special election in Philadelphia; Black self-determination is an election issue in St. Petersburg, Florida; and, a lesson, on how to denounce and shame sell-out Black politicians.

But first, there seems no end to the anti-Russian hysteria Democrats have been spreading since they lost the election, in November. We spoke with Dr. Gerald Horne, the professor of history and African American studies at the University of Houston, who’s written extensively on the McCarthyism of an earlier era. Dr. Horne calls the current scare campaign “the Putin derangement syndrome.”

The Pennsylvania Green Party thought they had an excellent chance to win a special election for a state legislative seat from the Kensington section of Philadelphia, last week. But, the Greens say, the Philadelphia Democratic machine blatantly stole the election in broad daylight. Sheri Honkala, the Green Party candidate, has been activist in Kensington for decades. Both she and her Democratic opponent, Emilio Vázquez, were write-in candidates -- Honkala, the Green, because officials rejected her voter signature petitions, and Vazquez because the original Democratic candidate was charged with corruption. Hardly anybody in Kensington votes for Republicans. . But, despite the Greens running a vigorous campaign, with lots of boots on the ground, the Democrat was awarded the election by a huge margin of votes. Honkala says, it’s a fraud and a crime.

In St. Petersburg, Florida, 20 year old Eritha Akile Cainion is running for the City Council on a platform of Black Self-Determination. She’s putting into practice some of the 19 points of the Black Is Back Coalition’s National Black Agenda for Self Determination. The Coalition this weekend holds a two day electoral political school in St. Petersburg, to help train a new breed of Black political activists and candidates. City Council candidate Cainion explains the message that she brings to her campaign.

Black community activists in New York City recently disrupted a speech that Bronx city councilman Andy King was trying to give before an audience at the Schomburg Center for Research on Black Culture, in Harlem. Shannon Jones is a co-founder of the organization “Why Accountability,” which is working in solidarity with the 120 young men swept up in a huge police raid of a public housing project in The Bronx. Andy King is the councilman for that district, but rather than come to the aid of his constituents, King cozied up to the cops. And then KIng went to the Schomburg Center, according to Shanon Jones, and tried to pose as a criminal justice system reformer. In an interview with Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser, Jones explained why councilman King.needed to be shamed and made accountable, to the people of Harlem and the Bronx.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Human Rights Watch pretends to defend vulnerable people from abuse by powerful forces all around the world. But, most of the time, Human Rights Watch defends U.S. foreign policy. And, as the pace of prison activism increases by the month, Prison Radio brings you voices from behind the bars.

If you listen to the Democrats, you might believe that the nation and the world are in crisis because of two people: Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. But, if you’ve been following Black Agenda Report’s discussions with Dr. Anthony Monteiro, the Duboisian scholar based in Philadelphia, you’ve probably developed a more scientific view of what’s happening in the world. 

Human Rights Watch claims to be a neutral international rights organization, but has always acted as an extension of United States foreign policy. The actual relationship between the international NGO and the superpower is most clear in the case of Rwanda, where the United States backs Paul Kagame’s vicious Tutsi minority dictatorship. The Rwandan regime imprisons or kills who that point out that hundreds of thousands of Hutus, who constitute the overwhelming majority of Rwanda’s population, were killed by Kagame’s forces during the bloodbath of 1994. Human Rights Watch defends the Rwandan government’s repression of dissidents like Joseph Nkusi, who lived in exile in Norway but was deported to stand trial in Rwanda for challenging the regime’s genocide story. Ann Garrison is a writer living in Oakland, California, and frequent contributor to Black Agenda Report. She’s spent many years covering the repression in Rwanda.

Khalfani Malik Khaldun is an inmate at Wabash Valley prison, in southern Indiana. Khaldun recently published an essay for Prison Radio. It’s titled, “There is a Storm a’Coming: Repression Breeds Revolutionary Resistance.”

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: It’s been almost 50 years since Dr. Martin Luther King broke with a Democratic President over the Vietnam War, but talking peace is still politically risky; and, whether you want to reform the U.S. prison system, or abolish it altogether, you’ll want to be in Washington on August 19, for the Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March. 

Lots of folks give lip service to the idea of community control of the police. But some people in Washington, DC, are doing something about it. Netfa Freeman is with Pan African Community Action, in the nation’s capital. Freeman’s organization supports a community control of the police plan similar to the system envisioned by the late Black Panther Party leader, Huey P. Newton. However, with all the political energy and outrage directed at President Donald Trump, or the Russians, there doesn’t seem to be as much focus as before on the issue of police terror in Black America.

The Black is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations is engaged in two main projects. One, is an upcoming, two-day Electoral Politics School, to be held April 8th and 9 th , in St. Petersburg, Florida. The other is the Coalition’s commitment to Black Community Control of the Police, a key item in the Coalition’s 19-point National Black Agenda for Self-Determination, adopted last year. In Philadelphia, Black Is Back Coalition organizer Diop Olugbala says the two issues are intertwined.

Prison reform and prison abolition groups across the country are gearing up for a Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March, set for August 19 th in Washington. Paster Kenneth Glascow is founder the “The Ordinary People Society,” comprised of formerly incarcerated persons. He’s also an “outside” spokesman for the Free Alabama Movement, which is run by prison inmates, themselves. One of the Free Alabama Movement’s key organizers is Kinetik Justice, also known as Robert Earl Council, a prisoner who was recently singled out for retaliation by Alabama prison authorities. Pastor Glascow explains.

On April 3 rd , peace activists will gather at the New York University School of Law for a discussion to mark the 100 th anniversary of the U.S. entrance into World War One, which was supposed to be the War to End All Wars. It’s also the day before the 50 th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s historic speech at New York’s Riverside Church, in which he broke with ] President Lyndon Johnson over the Vietnam War. We spoke with David Swanson, the author and activist who publishes the influential web site, War Is A Crime. He’s one of the organizers of the April 3 rd event at New York University. Half a century after Dr. King’s Riverside speech, it seems that even discussion of peace is considered politically suspect.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left. I’m Nellie Bailey.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The New York City Police Department was forced to lighten up on stop and frisk. So, now the cops are staging huge raids on public housing, and charging hundreds of young people with criminal conspiracy; And, Mumia Abu Jamal remembers the people’s lawyer, Lynne Stewart.

The National United Anti-War Coalition, UNAC, will hold its yearly conference in Richmond, Virginia, on June 16 th through 18 th . The theme of the conference is “The Need for an Independent Path” – meaning, a path to peace that is independent of the two corporate parties. UNAC’s Sara Flounders, explains.

Under the supposedly liberal Mayor Bill De Blasio, New York City cops have scaled back their stop-and- frisk practices, but have dramatically increased their sweeps of public housing projects, resulting in the arrest of hundreds of people on RICO conspiracy charges. The cops call the policy “precision policing.” Josmar Trujillo, of the Coalition to End Broken Windows, says the sweeps have had a devastating effect on poor communities in Harlem and the Bronx.

Funeral services were held in New York City, this Saturday, for people’s lawyer Lynne Stewart, who succumbed to cancer at the age of 77. Stewart represented many political prisoners in her long career. But, she herself spent four years in federal prison for vigorously representing her client. The nation’s best known political prisoner, Mumia Abu Jamal, pays his respects to Lynne Stewart.

Mumia and other inmates at prisons across the state of Pennsylvania say they are forced to drink and bathe in brown, smelly, tainted water. The foul water also exacerbates the effects of Abu Jamal’s Hepatitis C, an infection that afflicts 5,000 other inmates, but which the State of Pennsylvania refuses to treat. The Campaign to Bring Mumia Home has been organizing “National Days of Action” to highlight the water crisis. Black Agenda Report producer Kyle Fraser spoke with organizer Sophia Williams.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

 

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: the Democrats remain determined to blame the Russians for their failure at the polls, but fail to mount any real alternative to the Trump budget; How will the Black Lives Matter movement fare in the Age of Trump?; and, a Day of Outrage over tainted water in the Pennsylvania prison system.

School is in session, April 8 and April 9, at the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations. Black is Back chairman Omali Yeshitela says Black Liberation is in the lesson plan.

Ever since losing last November’s elections, the Democrats have made hatred of Russia the official religion of their political party. It’s as if today’s Democrats are channeling long-dead Republicans from the 1950s McCarthy era. We spoke with Ajamu Baraka, the former vice presidential candidate for the Green Party, a co-founder of the U.S. Human Rights Network, and editor and columnist for Black Agenda Report.

How will the Black Lives Matter movement fare in the Era of Donald Trump? Dr. Keeanga Yamahtta Taylor has been exploring that question. Dr. Taylor is a noted author and activist, and a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. She spoke, recently, at Wayne State University, in Detroit. Dr. Taylor compared the social destruction that occurred under the status quo of the Obama administration, and the dramatic descent into racist scapegoating under Donald Trump.

The nation’s best known political prisoner, Mumia Abu Jamal, used to reside on death row, in the Pennsylvania prison system, before the courts rolled back his sentence to life in prison. But, some people are living on death row that no longer face the death penalty, as Mumia Abu Jamal reports for Prison Radio.

Foul, tainted water threatens the lives of inmates throughout the Pennsylvania prison system, including the surviving members of the Move 9, who have been locked up since 1978, in the death of a policeman. The Move Organization and a coalition of groups has declared Monday, March 6, a Day of Outrage.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: the MOVE organization will hold a three day event to dispel confusion about why the Philadelphia police killed 11 of their members, burned out a whole city block, and put nine MOVE people in prison for life, in the 1970s and 80s; and, an advocate for the people of the Congo says it may be a good thing that Donald Trump doesn’t yet have a policy on Africa.

The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and other law firms have sued the State of Louisiana for denying poor defendants even the semblance of adequate legal counsel. Lawyers Committee president Kristen Clark says Louisiana violates the Constitution by depriving people charged with crimes with the means to defend themselves -- and that’s why the state is the “Incarceration Capital of the World.”

In 1985, Philadelphia police bombed the residence of the MOVE organization, killing 11 of the group’s members, including 5 children, and burning down a whole city block. Eight years earlier, nine MOVE members were sentenced to life in prison in the death of a policeman. But MOVE keeps on moving, and on May 5 th will hold a three day event, in Philadelphia, to counter decades of disinformation about the group. Ramona Africa is MOVE’s Minister of Communications.

President Donald Trump does not yet seem to have yet developed his own policy on Africa. That means former President Obama’s policies are still largely in effect – which is not necessarily a good thing, since Obama vastly increased the U.S. military presence in Africa, and continued Washington’s support for friendly dictators in the region. Kam-BAH-lay Moo-sah- VOO-lee is a native of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the DRC, and a spokesperson for the Washington-based advocacy organization Friends of Congo. He is particularly concerned about the lasting mark made on U.S. policy by two war hawks of the Obama administration: Samantha Power and Susan Rice. Under their influence, the U.S. State Department created a strange new agency, called the “Atrocity Prevention Board.” Moo-sah-VOO-lee explains.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host, Nellie Bailey. Coming up: Activists plan to counter President Trump’s threatened crackdown on so-called “sanctuary cities,” by expanding the movement to resist unjust laws and government repression; and, prison abolitionists say the U.S. system of mass incarceration is a continuation of old time slavery. They plan a Millions March for Prisoners Human Rights, in Washington, DC, this summer.

Donald Trump’s ban on refugees and visitors from seven mostly Muslim countries is a reflexion of the new president’s larger vision of who should be an American, according to author and activist Arun Kundnani. Kundnani recently wrote an article titled “Recharging the Batteries of Whiteness: Trump’s New Racial Identity Politics.” But, Trump’s anti-Muslim policies are nothing new. Kundnani says the seven targeted countries had already been singled out for special treatment under the Obama administration.

President Trump has long threatened to crack down on so-called “sanctuary cities” that refuse to collaborate in the mass deportation of undocumented immigrants. However, rather than go on the defensive, activists are vowing to broaden the sanctuary movement beyond immigration issues. According to Sue Udry, executive director of the Bill of Rights Defense Committee, the movement will be expanded to include resistance to other forms of state repression.

Anti-mass incarceration activists from across the country will converge on Washington, DC, on August 19 th , for a Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March. Black Agenda Radio producer Kyle Fraser spoke with one of the organizers: Brother Dee, of the Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee and Jailhouse Lawyers Speak. Brother Dee prefers not to give his full name, to avoid retribution by the authorities. He explained what the march in August is all about.

And that it’s for this edition of Black Agenda Radio. Be sure to visit us at BlackAgendaReport.com, where you’ll find a new and provocative issue, each Wednesday. That’s www.BlackAgendaReport.com. It’s the place for news, commentary and analysis, from the Black Left.

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