Archive for October 2020

 Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Margaret Kimberley, along with my co-host Glen Ford. Coming up: Millions of young people in the United States now see themselves as agents of transformational change, and one of the best places to begin is by studying Malcolm X. We’ll talk with an activist student of Malcolm’s life and work.  And, white nationalist militias seem to feel right at home in western North Carolina.  A young activist from Gastonia says the whole country needs to undergo a process of DE-white supremafication.

 

But first – the world is reeling from the double whammy of Covid-19 pandemic and a global economic depression. The crisis has created an historic opportunity for the super-rich to massively restructure capitalist economies in ways that spell disaster for poor and working people. We spoke with Anthony Monteiro, a Duboisian scholar and activist with the Philadelpohia Saturday Free School.

 

The Black Radical Tradition has always emphasized that Black American liberation is part of a global struggle. Desmond Fonseca is a doctoral student of history at the University of California who has lately been immersing himself in the study of Malcolm X.  Fonseca is greatly impressed with Malcolm’s writings, speeches and organizing work – especially in his latter years, when Malcolm was an outspoken advocate of Black American internationalism.

 

Lydia McCaskill is studying for both her Masters and Doctoral degrees at North Carolina Central University, and hopes to become a Constitutional Lawyer. But right now she’s a whirlwind of political activism in her hometown of Gastonia, in western North Carolina. McCaskill has launched a Stop Injustice Initiative.

 Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Margaret Kimberley, along with my co-host Glen Ford. Coming up: Black lives matter in prison, too, including homosexual Black lives. We’ll talk with an organizer for the abolitionist group “Black and Pink.” And, white supremacy is endemic in the United States, but a professor of Geography says anti-Blackness is spread around the world by Global Capital. 

But first – activists in Minneapolis says their protests have been disrupted by dozens of men and women wearing orange shirts that clearly have a relationship with the police. We spoke with Jae Yates, of the Twin Cities Coalition for Justice for Jamar.

The ideology of anti-Blackness is mobile, and is spread around the world by global capital. That’s the thrust of an article by Adam Bledsoe, a professor of Geography, Environment and Society at the University of Minnesota.. His article is titled, “The Anti-Blackness of Global Capital.”

How do Black LGBTQ inmates fare in the U.S. prison gulag?  A good place to find out is in the pages of “Black and Pink.” Fatima Shabazz is one the publication’s founders.

 Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Margaret Kimberley, along with my co-host Glen Ford. Coming up: Activists in Greenville, North Carolina successfully demand community control of the police. And, we’ll hear from a psychologist who’s done a study of the varied ideologies held by Black women.

 

But first, Shannon Jones is co-founder of Bronxites for NYPD Accountability, which on June 4th led a protest in the South Bronx section of New York that was massively attacked by police, who claimed the marchers had violated a curfew. At least 61 marchers and bystanders were injured, according to a Human Rights Watch study. More than 250 were arrested, including Ms Jones. She says the cops had been waiting for a chance to crack down on the movement.

Activists have clashed repeatedly with police in the eastern North Carolina city of Greenville. The protests have been led by the Mapinduzi organization and the Coalition Against Racism. Mapinduzi spokesman Dedan Wha-Kee-UR-ee says Greenville’s government continues to reject demands for Community Control of Police, an independent prosecutor for police brutality cases, and that a police substation be turned into a People’s Resource center.   However, the city did agree to end its involvement with the Pentagon’s 1033 program, that funnels military weapons and equipment to local police.

Dr. Ashlee Davis is the Supervising Psychologist and Coordinator for Diversity and Social justice Initiatives at Fordham University Counseling Center, in New York City. She’s author of a recent article, titled “Traditional Femininity Versus Strong Black Women Ideologies and Stress Among Black Women.” We asked Dr. Ashley, just what is

 “Strong Black Women Ideology”? 

Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Margaret Kimberley, along with my co-host Glen Ford. Coming up: We’ll talk with an activist-scholar we says anti-Black violence is not just endemic, not just in the United States but throughout Latin America. Political prisoner Mumia Abu Jamal has a commentary on the people and system that took Breonna Taylors life. And, China has the only economy strong enough to pull the world out of recession, but the United States seems bent on waging a New Cold War. We’ll hear from BAR contributing editor Danny Haiphong.

But first -- The Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparation, has marched on the White House every November since its formation in the first year of the Obama administration. The Coalition and its 15 member organizations will be in Washington on November 6, 7th and 8th, putting forward an independent Black politics. Black Is Back chairman Omali Yeshitela tells us about this year’s Black People’s March on the White House.

The whole world watched as millions took to the streets to demand a halt to police killings of Black people in the United States. But Black lives are at risk everywhere in the Western Hemisphere, according to Jameelah Imani Morris, an activist scholar workin on her doctorate at Stanford University.  Morris has done extensive work with Black youth in both the United States and Latin America. 

Mumia Abu Jamal is the nation’s best known political prisoner, a prolific author and journalist, now in his 39th year of incarceration in Pennsylvania. Abu Jamal’s latest report for Prison Radio is titled, “Breonna’s Deathbed.”

 

 


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